1. St Eanswythe’s and St Mary’s Church

© tfpc.co.uk
© tfpc.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Early History

In about 700BC Folkestone is first recorded as a distinctly named place as Folcanstan.

Folkestone is synonymous with the monastery at Folkestone recorded in a succession of pre-conquest charters and that the monastery has always been traditionally accepted as having been sited on the Bayle.
The earliest reference for St Eanswythe occurs in the mid eleventh century Kentish Royal Legend which records that Easnwythe was the daughter of Eadbald, king of Kent and that he founded a nunnery for her at Folkestone where she was buried. Her bones are in St Mary’s and St Eanswythe’s Church. Legend has it that she made the water run up the hill and form a pond which is still on the Bayle now. There has been church erosion on this site since St. Eanswythe’s Church and it has been renewed many times due to soil and cliff erosion.

Websites:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~folkestonefamilies/eanswythe.htm
http://oca.org/saints/lives/2015/08/31/103446-st-eanswythe-the-abbess-of-folkestone

Lesson Ideas:

Art

Art you could go and visit St. Eanswythe’s tomb and do real life sketches. Or copy her image from the stain glass windows/ design their own based on the ones that can be found in the church. It is also possible to do brass rubbing. Using either real glass and glass paints you could re-create St. Eanswythe. This can also be done using card and tissue paper.

(Cross curricular with RE and Christianity and History.)

NC Links: KS1:

To develop a wide range of art and design techniques.
To use drawing to share their ideas, imagination and experiences.

KS2:

To improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including their control and their use of materials.
To be taught about great artists, architects and designers in History.

Science

Conduct an experiment to find out how you can get water to run up a hill and what forces would make this possible.
Create your own tin-plate ponds, and plan what wildlife would live there.

NC Links: KS1: Identify and name a variety of plants in their habitats.

KS2:

Recording findings using simple scientific language, drawings, labelled diagrams, keys, bar charts and tables.
Compare how things move on different surfaces.

History

Learn about/ compare life now to life in St. Eanswythe’s era (600s)- clothing, food, entertainment etc.

NC Links: KS1:

To be taught about events before living memory and the lives of significant individuals in the past.

To be taught about significant people and places  in their own locality.

Literacy/ Drama

Children to create a piece of drama re-enactment St Eanswythe’s life, including the key moments of her life. For example, her birth, her grandfather’s death and the impact that this had, the building of the monastery, the miracles she is associated with etc.

NC Links: KS1/2:

Spoken language: To participate in discussions, presentations, performances, role play etc.

2. The German Embassy

German Embassy
German Embassy

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

At the bottom of the Bayle there is a street called the Parade. At the end is a large house with a large Tower which is in crested with a large Eagle. This was the German Consulate at the end of the 19th and at the beginning of the 20th centuries. At the outbreak of the First World War, two men were caught and subsequently hanged for sending Morse code signals which revealed   secrets about The British Army to  the German troops. This could be part of a much larger investigation into spies as it has been confirmed that M15 and M16 began in Folkestone.

 Websites:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/rogrammes/bo45gjnp
http://www.stepshort.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/Spy-Scares.pdf

Lesson Ideas:

Art

Architecture-generally looking at the building and discussing whether it had been design with spying in mind.If they were to design a spy building, what would it look like and why?

Focus on the Eagle. Can they draw it and then reproduce it in clay? This could be part of a whole topic on symbols and what they represent.

NC Links: KS1:

To use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.
To design purposeful, functional, appealing productions and make and evaluate  (DT)

KS2:

To be taught about great artists, architects and designers in History.

English

Link to all the stories and adventures about spies, particularly those in WW1.

NC Links: Upper KS2:

To continue to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of books.

PE/ Dance

Create group and pair dance to spy music, considering the way a spy may move- levels, speed, actions etc.
(Topic on codes and code breaking could also link to maths -problem solving and History.)

3. Remembrance Hill

Road of Remembrance © Clare Banks
Road of Remembrance © Clare Banks

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All of the troops that fought in WW1 for the allies passed down this road, including Americans, Canadians and Australians etc. The hill is hugely symbolic as many of these men did not come back. In recent times, the railings all the way down the hill have been decorated with red crochet poppies to commemorate those who died in the World Wars.
At the top of Remembrance Hill, at the centre of the roundabout stands a  monument dedicated to those who lost their lives from Folkestone.

Websites:

http://www.stepshort.co.uk/projects/renovating-road-remembrance/
http://www.iwm.org.uk/memorials/item/memorials/1587
http://www.kentoline.co.uk/whats-on/news/departure-point-to-the-battlefields-21281/
http://www.kentoline.co.uk/whats-on/news/departure-point-to-the-battlefields-21281/ 

Art/ Design Technology

Discuss the poppies and their symbolism. Sketch  poppies and the various contrasting designs in their sketch books. Recreate them using crochet technique or alternatively tissue paper, card, paper plates, fabric.  Investigate the artists who created the poppies.

Children could redesign their own symbol to commemorate soldiers lost from World Wars or more recent wars.

Look at the font used to display the men’s names. This could lead to a whole topic on fonts. Use wax crayons to create rubbings of the fonts in sketch books. Compare with fonts on tomb stones in the areas. Suggest other fonts (ICT?)

Sketch and discuss the figure statue on top of the memorial. How was it made/ technique/materials- why (could discuss weathering  and why this material is suitable-possible link to materials in science and geography-weather).

NC Links: KS1:

To use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.
To be taught about the work of a range of artists.

KS2:

To create sketch books to record their observations and use them to review and revisit ideas.

History/ Geography

Discuss why there were so many different counties involved in the World Wars.
Identify countries involved on a map.

Both Key Stages: Understand historical concepts, including change, cause, consequence and significance.

KS2:

(Geog)  Locate the world’s countries, using maps to focus on Europe.

English

Newspaper reports reporting on the war and all the troops in Folkestone.
Writing letters-men writing home to their loved ones describing Folkestone and contracting to life in the trenches.

NC Links: KS1:

Writing for different purposes

KS2:

To identify the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form.

4. The Arch

Folkestone Arch © tfpc.co.uk
Folkestone Arch © tfpc.co.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Arc was built to remember the millions of service men and women who passed through Folkestone on their way to support the war effort during the 1914-18 conflict. The Folkestone Memorial Arch is situated at the top o Remembrance Road in Folkestone which was where many soldiers, nurses and civilians from all nations walked down to the harbour. It was designed by Philip Gearing. It is made of steel and also features little lights that symbolise stars and represent those who dies.

Philip Gearing says: “We created an outside classroom, it’s quite an interactive space. There’s a compass which tells the story of the various countries that sent people through Folkestone. They can use it for geometry and maths, geography, history and storytelling.”

Websites:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktHPIUZIcds
http://www.firstworldwarcentenary.co.uk/step-short-memorial-arch-folkestone/

Art

Ask children to discuss what they like/ dislike about the Arch, considering factors such as its purpose, location and materials used to create the structure. Is it a fitting memorial?
What would they build-could design their own and give reasons for their choices.
Sketch the arch. Recreate using paper/ foil/ clay.

NC Links: KS1:

To use a range of materials creatively to design and make products.

KS2:

To improve their mastery of art and design techniques, including drawing and sculpture with a range of materials,

English

Persuasive Writing- create arguments as part of a debate- pros and cons to creating the memorial.
Poetry/ information texts- Look at information written and displayed around the arch. Write and design their own  plaque to feature on the memorial.

NC Links: KS1:

Writing for different purposes.
Writing poetry

KS2:

To identify the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form.
Assess the effectiveness of their own and others writing.

Folkestone Curriculum Planning Feb. 2015, completed by staff at St Eanswythe’s Church of England Primary